Somewhere in Germany, 1946

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I have never published poetry before on this blog. Today, I make an exception.

In 2006, The Guardian published an article describing the atrocities committed by the British Labour Party in Germany, 1946. Following the Liberation of the camps from Fascism, the “Socialist” Labour Party proceeded to intern Communists, suspected or confirmed, in torture camps. The logic was to head off the Soviet Union & the spread of Socialism.

Robert Clough’s excellent book Labour: a Party Fit for Imperialism describes many of the atrocities committed by the British Labour Party over this same period. This is an addendum to his script. As we enter into a period of potential opportunist renewal, the Labour Party staggering toward a well overdue death, that part of our class history obscured, hidden & outright denied to us requires remembrance. Jeremy Corbyn is nothing. The Labour Party is responsible for more blood than any leader might ever account for.

Equally, this is an important lesson in what opportunist politics result in. Rather than simply a detrimental factor, an obstacle, to the development of a revolutionary politic, opportunism is an active class enemy of the proletariat. It will resort to anything to prevent proletarian Revolution, even torture camps.

The below poem is dedicated to our forgotten comrades, in Germany & throughout history. It is long overdue, now, that we set about uncovering the hidden history of our class.

A Word Never Uttered

Emaciated men,
skin limp over angular bones.
Skulls that glow
in the darkness, irradiated.
Tombs in the Chilean
hills. We never said a word.

I evoke history:
I say its name.

British concentration camps
growing like roses
from the ashes of the world.
Whitehall have released
a paper, comrade; a short
article in The Guardian.

Bleach: that is what they
use. “A process
of oxidation” over bones
& freshly turned earth.
Not a word was uttered.

Whitehall has released
a paper, comrade. In 1946,
the British government
held Communists in torture
camps, in Germany.
You were nameless
& will remain nameless.

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